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人間五十年、下天のうちをくらぶれば、夢幻の如くなり。
wildcat2030:


Neuroscientists identify key role of language gene - Neuroscientists have found that a gene mutation that arose more than half a million years ago may be key to humans’ unique ability to produce and understand speech. Researchers from MIT and several European universities have shown that the human version of a gene called Foxp2 makes it easier to transform new experiences into routine procedures. When they engineered mice to express humanized Foxp2, the mice learned to run a maze much more quickly than normal mice. The findings suggest that Foxp2 may help humans with a key component of learning language — transforming experiences, such as hearing the word “glass” when we are shown a glass of water, into a nearly automatic association of that word with objects that look and function like glasses, says Ann Graybiel, an MIT Institute Professor, member of MIT’s McGovern Institute for Brain Research, and a senior author of the study. “This really is an important brick in the wall saying that the form of the gene that allowed us to speak may have something to do with a special kind of learning, which takes us from having to make conscious associations in order to act to a nearly automatic-pilot way of acting based on the cues around us,” Graybiel says. Wolfgang Enard, a professor of anthropology and human genetics at Ludwig-Maximilians University in Germany, is also a senior author of the study, which appears in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences this week. The paper’s lead authors are Christiane Schreiweis, a former visiting graduate student at MIT, and Ulrich Bornschein of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Germany. All animal species communicate with each other, but humans have a unique ability to generate and comprehend language. Foxp2 is one of several genes that scientists believe may have contributed to the development of these linguistic skills. The gene was first identified in a group of family members who had severe difficulties in speaking and understanding speech, and who were found to carry a mutated version of the Foxp2 gene. In 2009, Svante Pääbo, director of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, and his team engineered mice to express the human form of the Foxp2 gene, which encodes a protein that differs from the mouse version by only two amino acids. His team found that these mice had longer dendrites — the slender extensions that neurons use to communicate with each other — in the striatum, a part of the brain implicated in habit formation. They were also better at forming new synapses, or connections between neurons. (via Neuroscientists identify key role of language gene — ScienceDaily)


kuwento ito.

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wildcat2030:

Neuroscientists identify key role of language gene
-
Neuroscientists have found that a gene mutation that arose more than half a million years ago may be key to humans’ unique ability to produce and understand speech. Researchers from MIT and several European universities have shown that the human version of a gene called Foxp2 makes it easier to transform new experiences into routine procedures. When they engineered mice to express humanized Foxp2, the mice learned to run a maze much more quickly than normal mice. The findings suggest that Foxp2 may help humans with a key component of learning language — transforming experiences, such as hearing the word “glass” when we are shown a glass of water, into a nearly automatic association of that word with objects that look and function like glasses, says Ann Graybiel, an MIT Institute Professor, member of MIT’s McGovern Institute for Brain Research, and a senior author of the study. “This really is an important brick in the wall saying that the form of the gene that allowed us to speak may have something to do with a special kind of learning, which takes us from having to make conscious associations in order to act to a nearly automatic-pilot way of acting based on the cues around us,” Graybiel says. Wolfgang Enard, a professor of anthropology and human genetics at Ludwig-Maximilians University in Germany, is also a senior author of the study, which appears in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences this week. The paper’s lead authors are Christiane Schreiweis, a former visiting graduate student at MIT, and Ulrich Bornschein of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Germany. All animal species communicate with each other, but humans have a unique ability to generate and comprehend language. Foxp2 is one of several genes that scientists believe may have contributed to the development of these linguistic skills. The gene was first identified in a group of family members who had severe difficulties in speaking and understanding speech, and who were found to carry a mutated version of the Foxp2 gene. In 2009, Svante Pääbo, director of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, and his team engineered mice to express the human form of the Foxp2 gene, which encodes a protein that differs from the mouse version by only two amino acids. His team found that these mice had longer dendrites — the slender extensions that neurons use to communicate with each other — in the striatum, a part of the brain implicated in habit formation. They were also better at forming new synapses, or connections between neurons. (via Neuroscientists identify key role of language gene — ScienceDaily)

kuwento ito.

Sep 18th at 9AM / via: scinerds / op: wildcat2030 / reblog / 369 notes

i’m planning a trip to aichi and checking out sharehouses and small ryokan to live in instead of hotels. the hotels seem closer to where i’m going, but i’m really interested in people who rent out their rooms. i’m envious of the stories they get to hear.

Sep 13th at 11PM / via: alterities / op: alterities / reblog / 28 notes
blakmajic:

The richest and most metaphorically resonant vine I’ve ever seen. And that’s saying something!

i ride this train to work everyday ._____.

blakmajic:

The richest and most metaphorically resonant vine I’ve ever seen. And that’s saying something!

i ride this train to work everyday ._____.

(Source: ForGIFs.com)

Sep 9th at 3PM / via: blakmajic / op: 4gifs / tagged: that ad of jeron teng is still there. / reblog / 94,140 notes
slojnotak:

Louis Meijer - Storm in het Nauw van Calais (1819-66)

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slojnotak:

Louis Meijer - Storm in het Nauw van Calais (1819-66)

Sep 8th at 2PM / via: berurouie / op: slojnotak / reblog / 2,825 notes

“thought is the courage of hopelessness.”

G. Agamben (via alterities)
Sep 6th at 9PM / via: alterities / op: alterities / reblog / 12 notes

“When a boy of fourteen or fifteen discovers that he is more given to introspection and consciousness of self than other boys his age, he easily falls into the error of believing it is because he is more mature than they. This was certainly a mistake in my case. Rather it was because the other boys had no such need of understanding themselves as I had: they could be their natural selves whereas I was to play a part, a fact that would require considerable understanding and study. So it was not my maturity but my sense of uneasiness, my uncertainty, that was forcing me to gain control over my consciousness. Because such consciousness was simply a steppingstone to aberration, and my present thinking was nothing but uncertain and haphazard guesswork.”

Yukio Mishima, Confessions of a Mask (via lehaaz)
Aug 30th at 6AM / via: alonsochb6 / op: lehaaz / reblog / 353 notes
made chop suey today. would be a bit better with some shiitake. 9 more dishes to unlock and i’m getting myself a beautiful new ceramic wok.

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made chop suey today. would be a bit better with some shiitake. 9 more dishes to unlock and i’m getting myself a beautiful new ceramic wok.

Aug 27th at 9PM / tagged: chop suey. text. / reblog

alterities:

S.Zizek, paraphrased

Aug 27th at 9PM / via: alterities / op: alterities / tagged: always. / reblog / 112 notes